Passion fruit & lime marinated tuna

The days are finally getting a little bit longer and brighter, and I’m loving it. It’s not that I don’t like autumn or winter (I love them!), but after December and if there’s a decided lack of snow, my interest tends to wane a little…it’s not even that I long for warmer temperatures, I just prefer to come home and not have it be so pitch black my brain thinks it may as well be the middle of the night!

This dish was created when we were having an abundance of gorgeous tuna — whether we went to the farm shop halls or the local supermarket’s fish counter, slabs of tuna steaks were waiting for us, and often at a much cheaper price than usual. So I mean, we had to buy it then, right…?

And as much as I love a grilled piece of tuna steak, there’s something so amazingly fresh about tuna that it sometimes seems a shame to do anything to it. It’s probably why my family and I love sashimi so much — when you have a piece of fish this good, why try and change anything about it?

So here we have it; a dish that’s a bit of a ceviche and a bit of sashimi combined together. The passion fruit part is a little fussy, but goes wonderfully with the tuna to cut through its richness. It’s pretty handy for serving at a party or gathering, since you can pre-slice the fish and arrange on a plate, and make the dressing, and keep both in the fridge before plating up just before serving.

Feeds 4 as a starter. Read More

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Gochujang chicken wings with sesame quick pickled cucumbers

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Does my blog need yet another chicken wing recipe? Admittedly, the answer’s probably no, but here we are. These recipes are quick, easy and the results are delicious, and this one’s no exception–pop the into the oven, make the easy gochujang-based sauce whilst the wings cook, and then gobble them up. So what more could you ask for really?

These wings are somewhat spicy, sightly tangy, and we chose to serve them as they are with just a quick sesame cucumber pickle, to take the edge off that heat.

Feeds 2 for a quick & light lunch. Serve up with some rice if you want to bulk it up a bit. Read More

Harissa & rose water chicken wings with spicy mint yoghurt dip

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My family just loves wings. Partly because they’re usually pretty quick and easy, unless you’re going down the fried route (and even that doesn’t necessarily take too long), but mostly because they’re delicious of course. If you’re a person who hates eating meat on the bone, then there might be a problem. But in my opinion, you should try and change that hatred, cause so far you’re actually doing yourself a disfavour and missing out big time.

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These wings are an awesome combo of spicy, sweet and sticky. The rose water is mild, like a slight afternote, so there’s no soapy flavour here at all. If it really messes with your mind to have rose water in this dish, leave it out, I guess…though I do recommend you give it a go, just the once.

Serves 2-3, as a light lunch
Adapted from hereRead More

Soy & ginger chicken wings with pickled radishes

They’re certainly messy, but I do like making (and eating) chicken wings. They feel a bit like bar food, but you can pick up a pack of like 20 of them for almost nothing here in England, and they make a great family lunch for all of us, and all things considered, don’t take all that long. I think they’re more popular over in the States, but the UK is slowly catching on in my opinion, since the town close to us has chicken wings popping up on menus all over the place these days.

(One thing that does confuse me though, is that I’ve seen the phrase “boneless chicken wings” (mainly on America-centric websites) and surely then it just becomes a chicken nugget?? It’s just one of those weird little things that niggle me ever since I’ve seen it)

These are just marinated and grilled in a simple soy, ginger, garlic and honey mixture, which is slightly salty and sweet, and served with a quick home-made radish pickle that pickles as you cook the chicken. Obviously, you’ll get the best results if you marinate the chicken wings overnight, but don’t sweat it if you find you’re starting barely an hour before you want to eat. Just make sure  to glaze the chicken wings constantly as you BBQ them (which I recommend over the oven, because that BBQ flavour is something you can’t cheat at).

Serves 2-3 as a light lunch. Read More

Honey & rosemary venison carpaccio

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This is such a simple dish to make, and takes very little time overall. It makes a lovely starter for a dinner party, or even a wonderful accompaniment with a fresh salad. I’ve also tried variations upon the marinade, including; crushed juniper berries, rosemary, crushed garlic and olive oil crushed juniper berries, sage, dried thyme, and olive oil Most have worked very well, so take the guidelines, and play with the flavours! I think the honey here lends a lovely sweetness that cuts against the richness of the meat. Makes a starter enough for 4-5 people.

DSC_6291-2 Read More

Goats cheese, roasted fig & honey sourdough toast

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This is more of an assembly-line list than an actual recipe. But, when the snack attack feelings kick in, this is a great and delicious way to up the ante on your usual toast!

It helps to focus on the cheese here; I chose rocamadour goats cheese, which is rather pungent, soft and spreadable, and a rich taste, but of course, feel free to choose your favourite! I recommend one that melts slightly when it meets the hot toast.

So, you will need;

2 slices of sourdough bread
roughly 4 small figs, halved, or sliced if using rather large figs
75g of goats cheese
1 tbsp of runny honey
sea salt

Preheat the oven to 200 degrees centigrade. Lightly oil a roasting tin, and pop in the figs for fifteen minutes or so, or longer if you have time to spare. Near the end of its roasting time, toast the sourdough and spread over the goats cheese on both slices. Top with the figs, and drizzle over some honey. Finish with a sprinkle of the salt, and enjoy!

Sea bass ceviche

sea bass ceviche

Ceviche, a dish originating and popular in the central and southern Americas, is one of those dishes I’ve always wanted to try. It’s typically fresh fish quickly cured in citrus juice, such as lemon, and seasoned. Somehow, I never got round to preparing it myself, but I took the chance now, with sea bass. More commonly you see tartares with fish such as tuna and salmon, but sea bass worked surprisingly well, better than I thought actually.

Naturally, if you’re not a fan of sushi and the like, this one’s probably not for you! But it’s a very clean, fresh dish that makes brilliant use of fresh fish, so obviously freshest is best. The lemon juice here quickly “cures” the fish, but not for long enough to actually cook it. You can prepare the ingredients in advance; just keep the lemon mixture separate from the fish until you’re just about to serve.

seabass ceviche

Serves 4 people as a starter.
You could use other fish, such as lemon sole, if you prefer.  Read More